Strip Comics!


Hi everyone, this is going to be a short one for my first post, sorry. I just wanted to introduce myself–Dave, hi–and talk about general stuff.

So, I don’t watch a lot of TV… which people find very strange for some reason. I’m also not on Facebook very much, if at all, which even more people find even stranger. I try not to mix those two facts with the fact that I don’t have a smart phone… because I think I’d be literally blowing peoples’ minds with that information. Anyway… I’m getting off topic. What I do tend to watch is YouTube. It’s awesome isn’t it? You could literally learn anything on that website, what’s more is that there are tonnes of really entertaining shows. Granted… there are tonnes of absolutely rubbish shows… but that’s the same as TV isn’t it… so not much you can do about that.

Where am I going with this? Oh yeah! So, there’s this channel I’ve been watching lately, it’s called comics explained and it’s fascinating. The guy covers everything there is to talk about regarding comics. Now… I’m not a comic reader… nor do I have any interest in them. However… this guy–Rob–is really interesting. There’s so much lore behind every comic, I had no idea so much thought went into them. There us also a rich history behind comics and a culture that is deeply entwined with society. For example, comics typically mirror the society of the time. In times of war, story arches mirrored, to some extent, what was actually happening in real life.

Other interesting areas are the evolution of heroes and villains. For example, both sets of antagonist and protagonists inherently had some additional super human abilities. When stories were first written, characters gained these powers through things like exposure to radiation or cosmic rays. However, it wasn’t long before story writers were struggling to introduce new characters as they were quickly running out of ideas and ways to give them special powers. It wasn’t until the late 80s that Stan Lee introduced the concept of characters gaining their abilities due to genetic mutation, from birth. This spawned a paradigm shift in comic story lines, opening the flood gates to new and exciting story arches that were practically limitless.

This however, spawned a new challenge. Stories were getting so expansive that it made it difficult to capture new audiences. New readers were being forced to learn a hell of a lot about characters and past events in order to understand current plots and events. With dwindling sales in the early 2000s Marvel and DC underwent a huge ‘reboot’ of their respective franchises. They reinvented characters and completely changed settings, spawning yet another new era of comics.

In General